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Moskvitch

Spending of many a pretty Kopek

So with Covid-19 restrictions lifting ever so slowly, the burning desire to spend some of the money you’ve saved through a lack of social activity and travel increases. Maybe then it’s time to put it all towards and new ride.

And speaking of slowly, what about this thing above? Let me tell you all about it…once I work out what it is of course…

Jokes, I kid. I have Google for that.

And drum roll please this would be a Moskvitch 407, hailing back to the days when all you needed to make a car was half an idea, a name and then a different number bolted on the end to tell them apart (which explains the Moskvitch 407,  Moskvitch 430 and the Moskvitch 400-420K that scored two numbers AND a letter. Bonus!)

Built by MZMA (which sounds suspiciously like a designer drug) this flashback to the late 50s/early 60s motoring came with a blistering 34 killer wasps screaming through it’s 1.3 litre 4 cylinder setup that struggled to get from 0-100 on account of it’s top speed hovering near the 88-90kph range.
Which would have been fine on the freeways back then but agonizing in any 110kph around Australia currently.

Still, if you’ve got a craving for some Russian..

Moskvitch 407

It does hold a bit of history for Mother Russia though, being the first soviet export to be truly successful in the west and apparently commanded a bit less import tax than other models (a saving of many Rubles? I’ll take it!)

It took me a second to find the official listing too on account of the auction yard calling it a Moskvic and doing away with what they felt was an unnecessary H. But here’s the details if you’re pining for something like this:

Description:
1962 AZLK Moskvic 407 1.4
Year: 1962
Make: AZLK Moskvic
Model: 407 1.4
Body: 4-Door Sedan LHD
Odometer: Indicating 50396 miles
Engine: 1.4L 4-Cylinder
Transmission: Manual
Colour: Cream orange/orange
Seats: 4
Description/extras:
• Matching numbers
• Original condition
• Soviet Russian LHD
• Milestone export model for Moskvic
• Renowned 1.4L 4-Cylinder inline-engine

Presenting a matching numbered, original condition Russian Moskvic 407 1.4 1962 example in an excellent overall mechanical and cosmetic condition. The release of the 407 1.4 series was considered a milestone as the first successful production of an export series to AZLK Moskvic.

Powered through a 1.4L 4-cylinder inline-engine and driven by its factory 4-speed manual transmission with synchromesh, this economic vehicle was able to deliver a notable 8L per 100km and produce 33KW paired to 88NM of torque.

An exterior finished in a two-tone setting of white and orange, its unique design saw over 400,000 units sold, including export examples. Polished chrome finishes, orange rim dish and its original front grill all showcase a well-maintained vehicle of its era.

With an interior that accommodates for 4, this example is finished in the factory orange-clothed trim, setting over a white dash and steering column. These vehicles are rarely seen among the classic car scene and are a true collector piece that are an investment opportunity in this condition.

Production of the Moskvic 407 1.4 series ran between 1958-1963. This 4-door sedan entered the market in Russia as the second-generation release to its predecessor the Moskvic 401, with distribution to mainly France, Norway and other European countries. In comparison to the 401 release of the Moskvic, the 407 was released with independent suspension with double wishbones, telescopic shock absorbers and a first 12V electric system.

Its direct rivals, the Fiat 1100 and Ford Prefect 100E were submerged to the Moskvics competitive design. Production of these examples was split into 2- one run for export (RHD) and original LHD production being sold into Russia

Moskvitch
What’s it worth then? Well I can only find one listing for another for sale currently and it’s up for just under $7000. I don’t if you’ve saved that much in isolation but I certainly haven’t…

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